An interview with Michael Fernandes

An interview with Michael fernandes

The emergency was quite a tumultuous time for their other brother Lawrence though. He was picked up under MISA too, tortured and was once even beaten up using branches of the banyan tree at the CID office in Bangalore. But more than the physical torment, it was the mental anguish he remembers. “He was taken to the railway tracks and they threatened to kill him and dump his body there,” says Michael. “I think at the time of my arrest the police weren’t so desperate, but with Lawrence they weren’t so patient,” he explains.

An interview with Michael Fernandes

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How the Emergency Took my Mother Away – Nandana Reddy

snehalata How the Emergency took my mother away - The News Minute

Now on the 40th anniversary, there is suddenly a clamour to remember Emergency and we find that there are just a few who are still alive and wish to do so. But I am grateful that we are remembering at all; especially now that a silhouette of another dictatorship is eclipsing our fundamental rights and undermining democratic institutions. The time has come to gather our forces and protect our rights and our country from tyranny.

– See more at: ://www.thenewsminute.com/article/how-emergency-took-my-mother-away-31525#sthash.0g9XVnk0.dpufHow the Emergency took my mother away | The News Minute

A time for renewal – some forgotten heroes of the Emergency

A time for renewal

An excerpt from the attached article

As we mark the 40th anniversary of the promulgation of the Emergency, we shall hear many politicians speak about their sufferings and sacrifices. L.K. Advani has already spoken, and no doubt other Bharatiya Janata Party leaders will follow. Perhaps we should remind them that Sanjay Gandhi’s wife, Maneka, is one of their cabinet ministers, while his henchman, Jagmohan, is also a senior BJP leader. Moreover, in BJP ruled states like Chhattisgarh, the bullying of the media, and the violation of the human rights of adivasis, are on par with what happened under Congress rule in Haryana and Uttar Pradesh during the Emergency.

The Meaning of the Indian Experience – the Emergency – an essay by Ajit Roy

‘Mrs. Gandhi’s success was predicated by two massive reserve forces operating in her favour (i) the passivity of the rural masses, and (ii) loyalty of the armed forces.’ The Indian events from the Indian perspective – An analysis of the Emergency by Ajit Roy, from a collection of essays, The Meaning of the Indian Experience – the Emergency, edited by Sarral K. Chatterji. Also worth reading: ‘My memories of Ajit Roy’ at http://praxisvision.blogspot.in/2011/07/my-memories-of-ajit-roy.html

Being Procrustes: editing and censorship during the Emergency

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Please follow the following link to access a couple of additions to the Emergency archive. These new ones (numbers 14 and 15) contain snippets from Satyavani (a contemporary newspaper) and a governmental statement on the (mis)use of mass media(1977). https://publicarchives.wordpress.com/full-text-collections/emergency/ These texts were contributed by Maya Dodd, Director of the Centre for South Asia at the Foundation for Liberal and Management Education, Pune. Maya Dodd’s PhD, ‘Archives of Democracy: Technologies of Witness in Literatures on Indian Democracy Since 1975′, among other things, dwelt on the literature produced during the Emergency of 1975 in India. Dodd revealed that the literature produced during the Emergency was easier to locate in University libraries in India that had systematically built up their collections in the 70s and 80s, than in the libraries of Delhi. In fact, texts that were sometimes unavailable in India could be traced in the library collections at the University of Chicago. All of these, she said, were stamped with the sign, PL480, Public Law 480, that allowed for the import of wheat from the US by India to be tied to the program for the acquisition of South Asian materials for American libraries. An international financial trade-off of the 1950s periodically unearths treasures for Indian scholars in the US. Read more on this issue at the link provided above…

“Will there be singing in the dark times?”- writing during the Emergency

Please follow the following link to access a couple of additions to the Emergency archive, these new ones (numbers 12 and 13) containing underground literatures published during the Emergency, and the haunting cover image from the collection of musings from an Emergency detainee at the Hardwar Jail-

https://publicarchives.wordpress.com/full-text-collections/emergency/

These texts were contributed by Maya Dodd, Director of the Centre for South Asia at the Foundation for Liberal and Management Education, Pune. Maya Dodd’s PhD, ‘Archives of Democracy: Technologies of Witness in Literatures on Indian Democracy Since 1975′, among other things, dwelt on the literature produced during the Emergency of 1975 in India. Dodd revealed that the literature produced during the Emergency was easier to locate in University libraries in India that had systematically built up their collections in the 70s and 80s, than in the libraries of Delhi. In fact, texts that were sometimes unavailable in India could be traced in the library collections at the University of Chicago. All of these, she said, were stamped with the sign, PL480, Public Law 480, that allowed for the import of wheat from the US by India to be tied to the program for the acquisition of South Asian materials for American libraries. An international financial trade-off of the 1950s periodically unearths treasures for Indian scholars in the US. Read more on this issue at the link provided above…